Archives

New Free Databases

By ACPL Genealogy Center

The Genealogy Center has made some recent additions to its Free Databases including:

Take a few minutes to see if any of these will aid your research, and remember that The Genealogy Center is always interested in expanding our online databases, so look around to see what you might want to share with us, and everyone else!

 

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Source: New Free Databases

    

New African American Databases

By ACPL Genealogy Center

Two new additions have been added to The Genealogy Center’s On-Site Databases for those interested in African American research. African American Historical Newspapers offers nine distinct newspapers featuring the Atlanta Daily World (1931-2003), The Baltimore Afro-American (1893-1988), Chicago Defender (1910-1975), Cleveland Call and Post (1934-1991), Los Angeles Sentinel (1934-2005), New York Amsterdam News (1922-1993), The Norfolk Journal and Guide (1921-2003), The Philadelphia Tribune (1912-2001), and Pittsburgh Courier (1911-2002). When the database opens, click on the “Genealogy” link to access the newspapers. Researchers can find obituaries as well as political and society articles by searching for a person’s name or keywords. Digital images of the articles are downloadable in a pdf format and and printable.

Our Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive database has recently been updated with a fourth collection covering the topic of emancipation. The site is searchable by name or keyword and offers an array of original documents, which are categorized on the results page as subject tabs on the top of the screen: Books and pamphlets, newspapers and periodicals, manuscripts, U.S. Supreme Court Records, and Reference. The digital images can be downloaded as a pdf or printed.

These wonderful new resources are available to those who visit The Genealogy Center or a branch of the Allen County Public Library.

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Source: New African American Databases

    

The Butcher, the Baker and the Candlestick Maker

By ACPL Genealogy Center

by Delia

Many of us see the same occupations over and over within our families. Farmers tended to beget farmers. Miner’s sons followed their fathers into the mines. Sons of doctors often traced their fathers’ footsteps into the medical profession. Teachers, both male and female, may appear in other lines. We may have a general idea of what our ancestors’ professions entailed, but perhaps not the details. Other times, we may have no idea what an occupation may be. The Genealogy Center has a number of sources to aid you in understanding your ancestors’ work lives.

Of course, if you run across an usual job title, one fast and easy method to discover what that occupation entails is to check an unabridged dictionary or check an Internet search engine and easily discover that a cordwainer is someone who works with fine leather, often a shoe maker. But to discover that a girdleier is one who makes belts or shashes or a shuttleworker is a weaver one may have to use Trades and services of Colonial times ( 973.2 T675).

There are also directories and lists of practitioners of various occupations, such as Patsy Page’s Directory of Louisiana physicians, 1886 (976.3 P14D) and the 1881 and 1896 editions of The Bankers’ directory and list of bank attorneys (929.11 R15B). There are also volumes from societies that cater to certain professions, such as the 1941 and 1949 editions of Roster of the Maine State Grange Patrons of Husbandry (974.1 G75RO). There are also business records available, like that for Sand Lake, New York’s Lumberman’s account book, 1839-1843 (974.701 R29LU) and the Finis Hurt Store account book, 1889-1890 (976.901 AD1WL) in Adair County, Kentucky.

But one of the best ways to understand your ancestor in his or her profession could be to read diaries from other members of that profession, such as Laurel Ulrich’s A midwife’s tale: the life of Martha Ballard, based on her diary, 1785-1812 (974.101 K37U) and The 1805 diary of the Rev. Dr. James Muir: minister of the Old Presbyterian meeting house in Alexandria, Virginia (975.502 AL27MUI). Of course, these diaries may also provide biographical information the people in the area.

So when you want to understand your ancestor, take some time to investigate his or her occupation to add a deeper understanding of their lives.

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Source: The Butcher, the Baker and the Candlestick Maker